Cincinnati Celebrates its German Heritage at Oktoberfest

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GermaniaSociety.com/site2007/main.html

There is plenty of entertainment on hand, with German music and dancing, and magic shows for the children. Tens of thousands participate in this annual event to help work off some of that rich German food and beer. It holds events throughout the year and also sponsors and promotes cultural programmes in the area, including German language schools and German radio programmes.

Mainstrasse Village Oktoberfest, 10-12 September 2010

Just across the river from Cincinnati in Covington, Kentucky, the historic German neighbourhood of Mainstrasse Village hosts its own annual Oktoberfest the weekend after Labor Day. Taking place the Friday before the festival on Fountain Square, dachshunds from all over the Cincinnati area, each dressed in a provided hotdog bun costume, race 100 feet to their waiting owners. The festival has been held in downtown Cincinnati since 1976 and has grown steadily over the years. On Sunday, the Germania Oktoberfest holds a Tug-O-War competition with teams of burly men (and women) trying to win the honour of this traditional show of strength.

Enjoy Oktoberfest in CincinnatiWhen the people of Cincinnati start measuring their dachshunds for hotdog bun costumes and practising their Chicken Dance moves, it can only mean one thing that it is time for Oktoberfest.

Mainstrasse Village is a German-style neighbourhood rich in history. For dessert there is plenty of strudel, pastry and cream puffs.

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati commences with what has become one of its most popular events, the Annual Running of the Wieners. Possibly more beer, bratwursts and potato pancakes are consumed in Cincinnati during Oktoberfest than in any other city in the country.

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, 18-19 September 2010

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati claims to be the second largest Oktoberfest in the world which would make it second only to the world-famous celebrations in Munich. Over 500,000 people attended Oktoberfest Zinzinnati in 2009.. The festival serves authentic German beers, German wine and schnapps.

A parade of lederhosen-clad German American representatives and the traditional tapping of the kegs officially opens the Oktoberfest on Saturday. It has over 30 shops, restaurants, hotels and pubs and hosts special events throughout the year, including a popular German-style Maifest, antique markets, wine festivals, a Christmas market and of course, Oktoberfest.

For those looking to experience some authentic German culture and fun, Cincinnati is the place to be during Oktoberfest season.

The Germania Society of Cincinnati was founded in 1964 to provide a place for Germans and German Americans in the Cincinnati area to meet and celebrate their heritage. Festivities begin with a keg tapping ceremony and there is plenty of German and American food, beer, music ranging from traditional German to rock and country, and over 90 arts and crafts booths on offer.

Further Information

Entertainment includes polka music and dancing and, of course, the Worlds Largest Chicken Dance. This year the Oktoberfest welcomes a very special guest, as Homer Simpson himself arrives in Cincinnati to lead the dance.

Germania Society Oktoberfest, 27-29 August 2010

The Germania Society of Cincinnati has held its “original and most authentic” Oktoberfest since 1971. Not called the Worlds Largest for nothing, the Chicken Dance at Oktoberfest Zinzinnati found its way in the record books in 1994 with 48,000 participants. The winning dachshund receives a prize and spectators get to enjoy German food and beer as well as a world-class sporting event.

OktoberfestZinzinnati.com/okt.aspx

Cincinnati is proud of its German heritage and during the months of August and September, the entire city celebrates the German tradition of Oktoberfest with not just one but three festivals taking place in and around the city. Taking place at the clubs headquarters, Germania Park on Kemper Road, the festival features plenty of German food and beer, including full dinners that can be purchased at the clubhouse, as well as food tents selling sausage, limburger cheese and other German food. Today, it covers an area of six city blocks, from Race Street to Broadway, devoted to German music, food and beer. Streets are lined with tents selling beer and German food of all varieties including brats, metts, potato pancakes, sauerkraut, pretzels and potato salad

Posted August 19th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

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